Time to reflect on our Antarctic journey

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Overlooking the Beagle Channel in Ushuaia, Argentina. Watching the sun set on the day, but also on our Homeward Bound expedition. Although our expedition together has ended, our journey together has only just started. [photo copyright Shelley L. Ball]

It’s nearly 11pm on December 22nd. I”m sitting here in a hotel, high on a hilltop overlooking Ushuaia, Argentina, the End of the World, as it’s called. The sun has set behind a dramatic array of clouds, with the mountains across the harbour as their backdrop. The lights of Ushuaia are twinkling in the town below and I feel a sense of stillness and peace, something that has eluded me until now. Finally, the time has come for reflection. It has been an indescribably busy three weeks on our Homeward Bound Women In Science Leadership Expedition. But also an indescribably transformational and unforgettable experience. The version of me that stepped off our ship, the Ushuaia, a few days ago is not the same version of me that stepped onto that ship on December 2nd.

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It is hard to find the words to describe the Antarctic landscape. [photo copyright Shelley L. Ball]

It’s been very difficult to find the words to describe what I have been experiencing, seeing, and feeling during our Antarctic voyage. Between the stunning, almost surreal landscapes of the Antarctic Peninsula, the massive amount of work we’ve done during the expedition around leadership, vision, and strategy and the shear exhaustion of long hours of work with little quality sleep, and the discussions, connections and sharing of dreams and visions with the women on this expedition,  it’s been nearly impossible to process what’s been happening and even harder to find the words to describe it. But I am back in Ushuaia, Argentina, the place of our departure to Antarctica on the very southern tip of South America and the southern-most city in the world. Our 20 day expedition has ended and we are left to say our final  ‘see ya later’ to the amazing, incredible, inspiring, courageous, and determined women on Homeward Bound.

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Gentoo penguins in Antarctica. Seeing penguins with a snow gently falling felt like being inside a snow globe. [photo copyright Shelley L. Ball]

 I had hoped to write a blog post per day during the expedition, but for some strange reason, I couldn’t find my voice. The words were simply not there. Gone. No matter how hard I tried, I could not conger up any words to describe what we were seeing and experiencing. So now, with the time to pause and reflect, the words are beginning to come.

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The diversity of shapes, colours and sizes of Antarctic icebergs is beyond description. I’ll let the images speak for themselves. [photo copyright Shelley L. Ball]

I want to share this journey with you. I want to share my transformation with you. I want to share the incredible and indescribable beauty of Antarctica with you. But most of all, I want to share with you my passion for protecting our planet’s beautiful yet fragile wild places, in the hopes that maybe you too will feel a sense of stewardship and a need and desire to protect nature. And finally, I want to share with you the power, courage and commitment of 76 women in science from the around the world and the phenomenal team that brought us all together and created this journey for us. Our Homeward Bound Women In Science Leadership Expedition to Antarctica is about creating change, about women coming together to become leaders in creating a sustainable future for our planet. Visionaries  and influencers in the making.

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A Chinstrap penguin soaking it all in. [photo copyright Shelley L. Ball]

Homeward Bound Women In Science Leadership Expedition to Antarctica

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It’s here! It’s finally here! After nearly 2 years of waiting, hard work, connecting, planning, and anticipation, it’s here. Tomorrow I will be boarding an airplane bound for Buenos Aires and then Ushuaia, in Argentina. Ushuaia is where we – 76 women from around the world, all with science backgrounds – will board our ship (The Ushuaia) and head for the Antarctic Peninsula.

Homeward Bound isn’t a vacation. It’s a women in science leadership expedition. Our mission – to elevate the role of women in science, to enhance our leadership abilities, and to have an influence on decision making and policy development, globally, around sustainability and climate change. In a nutshell, it’s about creating a better future.  And we believe that women need to play a far, far greater role in shaping that future, than we have in the past.

Homeward Bound isn’t just a women’s leadership expedition. It’s the beginning of a movement. It’s the beginning of change, of a new era where women have an equal seat at the table, where gender ratios in all careers are far more balanced, but most especially in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math).

Homeward Bound 2016 is the first. It’s a lot of firsts. It’s the first of 10 planned Homeward Bound expeditions, leading to 1,000 women having participated and being out there influencing the world. It’s the largest women’s Antarctic expedition. For many of us, it’s our first trip to Antarctica.

Over the course of this journey and adventure, I’ll be writing about my experiences. I’m not sure if I’ll be able to blog from the ship in Antarctica, but if I can, I will. If I can’t, then I’ll be posting my blog entries soon as I get back to Ushuaia on December 21st.

A big thank you to everyone who has supported me through this nearly 2 year process to get to this point. It’s been a long haul, but the support and encouragement has been overwhelming and for that, I am truly grateful. In my experience, nothing of true value was ever easy to attain. It takes effort and commitment, courage and trust. Who knows what the next month will bring, but I’m ready for this adventure…

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